From SoHo to the Lower East Side, all of the “hip” and “happening” places may seem like they’re Downtown. Moving up the grid past Houston, past Midtown, past Columbus Circle, and past Central Park, travelers can find a different and storied world well worth checking out. Here’s a taste, with 5 intriguing spots above 100th street.

The Apollo Theater

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image via flickr

This historic Harlem theater has an extraordinary list of alumni performers worthy of its own hall of fame. Some iconic names include Michael Jackson, James Brown, and Aretha Franklin. Check out this hotspot for up-and-coming musicians and amateur comics and take an active look into classic New York City entertainment.

Hamilton Grange National Memorial

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The former home to George Washington’s right-hand man Alexander Hamilton is a peculiar federalist transplant filled with historical relics and open to viewers. This National Park Service site sits in St. Nicholas Park in Hamilton Heights.

Red Rooster

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Helmed by celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson—you know him from Top Chef, the Obamas know him from their first State Dinner—Red Rooster is one of the city’s most renowned soul food restaurants. In the heart of Harlem, Samuelsson hits home with fried yardbird under white gravy and shrimp with cheddar grits.

The Cloisters

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High above the rest of Manhattan in leafy Fort Tryon Park, The Cloisters is a branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to Medieval and Renaissance European art. Five religious abbeys from Spain and France were reassembled to form the museum, which houses roughly 5,000 works of art from the 12th through 15th centuries. In spring and summer, the surrounding gardens and inner courtyards burst with color.

Little Red Lighthouse

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Jeffrey Hook’s Light is a tiny red lighthouse under the George Washington Bridge in Fort Washington Park. The inspiration for iconic children’s’ book, The Little Red Lighthouse, the landmark offers some nostalgia, but mostly a scenic and calm resting spot for Uptown explorers.